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Health Journey Support | What You Need to Know About Triglycerides

Triglycerides are the most common type of fat in your body. This brochure describes where triglycerides come from, how they can increase your risk of heart disease, and things you can do to manage high triglycerides.

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THIS INFORMATION IS INTENDED FOR US CONSUMERS

What You Need To Know About Triglycerides Br

What You Need to Know About Triglycerides

Triglycerides are a type of fat

They are the most common type of fat in your body. They come from foods like butter, oils, and other fats you eat.

Triglycerides also come from extra calories. These are the calories that you eat, but your body does not need right away. Your body changes these extra calories into triglycerides, and stores them in fat cells. When your body needs energy, it releases the triglycerides.

What You Need To Know About Triglycerides Br

High triglycerides can increase your risk of heart disease, such as coronary artery disease

Factors that can raise your triglyceride level

  • Regularly eating too many calories, especially if you eat a lot of sugar
  • Being overweight or obese
  • Smoking cigarettes
  • Excessive alcohol use
  • Certain medicines
  • Some genetic disorders
  • Thyroid diseases
  • Poorly controlled type 2 diabetes
  • Liver or kidney diseases

Understand your triglyceride level

What You Need To Know About Triglycerides Br

Levels above 150 mg/dL may raise your risk of heart disease.

Things you can do to manage high triglycerides

  • Controlling your weight
  • Regular physical activity
  • Not smoking
  • Limiting sugar and refined foods
  • Limiting alcohol
  • Switching from saturated fats to healthier fats

Some people may need cholesterol medicines to manage their triglycerides.

Always talk to your doctor about what is best for you. Ask your doctor before starting any treatments or making changes in your routine or medicine.

Source: National Institutes of Health; U.S. National Library of Medicine; MedlinePlus; Triglycerides.